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Rallyverse Roundup: Tumblr Changes, YouTube Safer For Brands, Facebook Whack-a-Mole,

By , on November 18, 2013 at 1:23 pm

Hope y’all had a great weekend! Today’s Rallyverse Roundup has suggested changes for Tumblr, analysis on Facebook’s ongoing whack-a-mole problem, insight as to why YouTube might now be a little safer for brands, news about a new platform made for connecting apps and services like Dropbox, and more.

This BuzzFeed homepage is tailored for our readers in the English. This BuzzFeed homepage is tailored for our readers in the English. Switch to US Have you seen BuzzFeed English? Your Post Has Been Launched!. Fabulous! Don’t forget to share with your friends on Twitter and Facebook. Facebook’s Whack-A-Mole Problem. After Facebook’s Snapchat clone was a dud, it tried to buy the original for $3 billion only to have the offer turned down. CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s next challenge will be figuring out what apps his company is actually capable of cloning — and which ones he needs to buy. November 15, 2013 at 2:41pm EST. Facebook’s Whack-A-Mole Problem.
BuzzFeed
Nov 18, 11:38 AM

You know what’s cool? Snapchat. And Instagram. And basically any other app aimed at teens that isn’t Facebook.

Tumblr is a blogging platform that allows you to share several different types of content, making it fairly flexible to the needs of its many users. No social network is perfect, however, and Tumblr could use a few upgrades or new features. While different users might want vastly different services and alterations to the platform, there are some changes that would be beneficial to the majority of the Tumblr community See also: The Complete Guide to Tumblr Subcultures Whether it’s avoiding Game of Thrones spoilers without add-ons or figuring out which cute cat photo has earned the most notes, here are six changes we would make to Tumblr. Read more… More about Social Media , Tumblr , and Features
Mashable
Nov 18, 6:08 AM

Whether it’s avoiding Game of Thrones spoilers without add-ons or figuring out which cute cat photo has earned the most notes, here are six changes we would make to Tumblr.

Google’s recent effort to silence trolls with a new YouTube commenting policy might actually be a boon to brands. YouTube in September began directing its users to open an account on Google , the search giant’s social network, if they want to sound off on videos. While there has been some user outcry, there are signs that YouTube is becoming a quieter place. In fact, one YouTube partner, vidIQ—after surveying 1,300 random posts—found that there were 40 percent fewer comments since the changes were implemented. “We expect these numbers to rebound as the kinks get ironed out and brands take advantage of the beneficial new features,” a vidIQ spokesperson said. Indeed, one hoped-for effect of the policy change is that the typically nasty comment threads attached to videos would become more civil if people have to open Google accounts, potentially tying the online personas to the real world. YouTube, which declined comment, is measurably among the most negative social media landscapes online, ahead of blogs but behind sites like Tumblr when it comes to civility, according to a recent social media report from Adobe. YouTube trolls have terrorized some marketing campaigns on the site, scaring brands that have tried to embrace the promotional platform. Going forward, industry insiders who work with brands on YouTube said the commenting changes would instill needed confidence in marketers to engage on the video-sharing site. “YouTube is putting so much more emphasis on making it a friendly place for brands,” said Robert Sandie, co-founder of vidIQ, which helps brands navigate YouTube, including eBay and Warner Bros. That emphasis is clear—witness last week’s $100 million YouTube-heavy upfront deal between Google and Publicis shops DigitasLBi and Razorfish . And to get the most of YouTube, brands need to engage with commenters; ignoring them can kill a campaign. One media insider recalled a top publisher’s YouTube effort to launch a video series that was cut short after a negative commenter assaulted the first video post. The chorus stole the show, overpowering the message the company was promoting, the insider said, and the brand ultimately killed the series. YouTube publishers always have the option to bar commenting on individual posts, but that’s a dilemma for marketers who know that comments increase engagement, according to Sandie. “Not every brand thinks of YouTube as a social network,” Sandie said. “They think of it as a place to dump videos and hope engagement occurs. They need to be actively participating and commenting to get the full benefit.”
Adweek
Nov 17, 9:49 PM

While there has been some user outcry, there are signs that YouTube is becoming a quieter place. In fact, one YouTube partner, vidIQ—after surveying 1,300 random posts—found that there were 40 percent fewer comments since the changes were implemented.

There are a lot of stereotypes and misconceptions when it comes to brands: how they operate and how decisions are made. That’s why we’ve asked some brand execs to weigh in on five brand myths to assess how much truth, if any, lies in these perhaps not-so-tall tales. The post The Urban Legends of Brands appeared first on Digiday .
Digiday
Nov 18, 12:02 AM

While from the outside, it may look like some brands are slow adapters and that they don’t understand or care about their agencies, these kinds of assumptions aren’t always true.

Salesforce.com is launching Salesforce1, its next-generation CRM platform that it has designed for developers, independent software vendors and customers to connect apps and third-party services such as Dropbox, Evernote and LinkedIn. The mobile first environment symbolizes the company’s focus as a platform provider with the promise of connecting the enterprise to the billions of things that are increasingly capable of being programmed through APIs. It’s a big promise, especially considering that most companies are still finding their way with how to use mobile apps and services for marketing and sales.
TechCrunch
Nov 18, 12:01 AM

The mobile first environment symbolizes the company’s focus as a platform provider with the promise of connecting the enterprise to the billions of things that are increasingly capable of being programmed through APIs.

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